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View Full Version : Some variety....identify this bush! ...and a tree.



mattkime20
08-22-2006, 07:51 AM
I'm curious what is growning in my brooklyn backyard.


Can anyone identify this bush? I think it needs to be cut back severely but I don't want to kill it. Any ideas on how I should go about this?

http://img105.imageshack.us/img105/5673/dsc00028vu8.jpg
http://img291.imageshack.us/img291/9158/dsc00029rn0.jpg

This is a branch from a tree that has taken root. Anyone know what kind it is? It seems to be extremely fast growning. I'd like to have another tree in our yard so I'm thinking about letting it grow. Unfortunately I can't provide an overall image because its so intertwined with the vegetation it rose from.

http://img201.imageshack.us/img201/5181/dsc00030ez5.jpg

Quirky Quercus
08-22-2006, 07:35 PM
The bottom one kinda looks like a hackberry (tree). The leaves do.
Still working on the top one for ya.

thentavius
09-09-2006, 12:12 PM
In one respect, I think that nice big bush gives you privacy from the neighbor's yard. :D

Ilovetrees
05-29-2007, 09:39 AM
In one respect, I think that nice big bush gives you privacy from the neighbor's yard. :D

I totally agree. I'd let it grow for that reason alone! What's wrong with a bushy bush? I never understood everyone's obsession with cutting bushes 'waaay' back. In my neighborhood people cut their bushes till there's nothing left but the trunk pieces. It looks ugly and dead. I prefer green, healthy growth.

Ellyssian
05-29-2007, 10:36 AM
I totally agree. I'd let it grow for that reason alone! What's wrong with a bushy bush? I never understood everyone's obsession with cutting bushes 'waaay' back. In my neighborhood people cut their bushes till there's nothing left but the trunk pieces. It looks ugly and dead. I prefer green, healthy growth.

I expect it mostly has to do with people ignoring one of the primary rules of landscaping design: the right plant in the right place.

They put something in because they like how it looks, but then it grows out of the bounds they want it to stay in, so chop chop.

Or, worse, they think it looks better.

Ilovetrees
05-29-2007, 07:08 PM
I guess it's like people who get a cute puppy and don't like the dog he grows up to be and they get rid of him :(

alexinoklahoma
06-01-2007, 09:15 PM
Then again, many bushes *only* bloom on new growth, and letting it 'go' becomes unruly and many fewer blooms, and it becomes gangly and/or 'old looking', IMO. Oftentimes, its a species thing - like a number of Hydrangeas or maybe some quince. Keeping them regrowing new wood each year provides a better visual if *that* was why it was planted there in the first place ;) Planting for *screening* purposes disqualifies that reasoning, however, for sure. I have a Quince that I cut hard each year for flowering/fruiting reasons - to each their own when its a species with unique purposes. Or maybe like some 'berry' bushes - mow 'em to ground each year, right? I know - an extreme example...and the un-ID'd bush does not qualify on *that* respect for sure, haha...

Or flowering 'Japanese Apricots' or 'puss willows' - gotta stay on the chopping or else it gets to be less than the *why* it was planted in first place -right?? Right place, right plant, and right *reason* for the previous two phrases ;)

My .02,
Alex

thentavius
07-25-2007, 06:19 PM
<<Then again, many bushes *only* bloom on new growth, and letting it 'go' becomes unruly and many fewer blooms, and it becomes gangly and/or 'old looking', IMO.>>

True. Some bushes do need a little cutting to encourage growth. :-)

Ilovetrees
07-26-2007, 11:36 PM
I think that "tree that has taken root" may be some kind of annual weed. I have had something much like that in my yard the last couple years, and I thought they were trees but they died with the winter and did not come back in the spring. I disagree the bottom is a hackberry, my whole yard and flowerbed are loaded with hackberry saplings thanks to my neighbors big tree and those leaves look too wide and too curved to be one.

alexinoklahoma
07-27-2007, 09:19 AM
I disagree the bottom is a hackberry, my whole yard and flowerbed are loaded with hackberry saplings thanks to my neighbors big tree and those leaves look too wide and too curved to be one.

Younger hacks have leaves a bit different than bigger trees, fwiw, at least around here anyways, and the 'curling'/bent tips is definitely notable on many leaves, especially from older wood. If the the hack is big enough, the bark is a real giveaway - its always kinda knobby, like it has acne or such, and greyish overall. Hacks usually have bumps on leaves from a wasp that lays eggs within the leaves - any 'bumpy' leaves by chance? You can always do a search of images at images.google.com and compare those pics with what you have there, of course ;) Also, hack leaves typically are not symmetrical where leaf stem meets leaf, kinda like Elm leaves, so that would be another way to nail down the ID, IMO, and I can't quite tell from that one pic, but it looks like leaves are as such.

When you say 'branch that has taken root' - you mean a fallen branch? Or one that touched ground and rooted (ground-layer, per se)? Hacks root *really* easily - cuttings are soooo easy with hacks, IME, and *may* be another point of ID confirmation (?)

I've seen 'mulberries' look much like hacks for first year or two until leaves start getting the lobes/divisions and becoming larger in size as it grows - seems to take a number of years for some mulberry to get the 'typical' leaves, IME. Throw that in as a *distant* possibility - any other mulberries around?? But mulberries do not get the zig-zaggy stems like hacks, I believe.

I have no ideas on the bush - sorry :(

HTH,
Alex

native_nut
07-27-2007, 10:59 AM
Could the first one be an Aronia arbutifolia (Red Chokeberry)? I have one just like this and in the spring it's covered with thousands of clusters of white, sweet smelling flowers followed by red berries that are quickly gobbled up by the birds. Mr. Dirr says that the berries are shunned by birds but the new Robins here stripped it quickly. It was here before us so I have been looking for it in the local nurseries to no avail. I don't know how old it is before the flowering and fruiting starts. Also mine is a brilliant red in the fall. The 'new' leaves are shaped the same as your picture. I wanted to take a pic of mine but it's been raining for 3 hours now. I've also been looking through the Viburnums in my books but nothing yet. Maybe the 'Wise Guys' of the treeblog can offer more insight on this.

~Kim~

Ilovetrees
07-27-2007, 08:04 PM
Younger hacks have leaves a bit different than bigger trees, fwiw, at least around here anyways, and the 'curling'/bent tips is definitely notable on many leaves, especially from older wood.



I agree, but isn't his a baby too?

And yes, my hacks have those lumps, now I know what causes them!



I've seen 'mulberries' look much like hacks for first year or two until leaves start getting the lobes/divisions and becoming larger in size as it grows - seems to take a number of years for some mulberry to get the 'typical' leaves, IME. Throw that in as a *distant* possibility - any other mulberries around?? But mulberries do not get the zig-zaggy stems like hacks, I believe.

I have no ideas on the bush - sorry :(

HTH,
Alex


Hey, this is a good idea, because most of what I thought were hacks in my backyard turned out to be mulberries! I noticed the leaves were getting wider and shinier than the hacks in the front and side yards, and they had some random mitten shaped leaves among them, almost like a sassafras. I posted the pics here and was told they were indeed mulberries.

alexinoklahoma
07-28-2007, 09:28 AM
'love: to clarify, I was meaning 'baby' to refer to the ones that are maybe a foot or three tall. The one pic'd appears to be somewhat larger/older to me. Call it a perception problem, LOL.

And fwiw, most hacks will have kinda zig-zaggy stems (Elmish-like), a bit of 'angular growth of stem' from each new outward growth point whereas mulberries are more or less arrow-straight if you took off all the leaves from a longish stem/branch. Make sense? The zig-zag goes away as the stem/branch matures thickens within a few years at most, but by then the leaves are a dead giveaway (usually) :)

Alex

ChrisMU2004
08-14-2007, 07:16 PM
I'm new to this board but I just thought I'd throw in my two cents. To me the bush looks like a Bridal Wreath Spirea, especially the leaves. My parents had a bunch of them in front of their 1870's farmhouse and they helped shield the house and yard from the road dust. I also had a couple of them at the house I previously lived at in Iowa, also an old farmhouse. They can be cut back pretty far without damage and they grow back quickly after pruning.

DonicaBen
04-05-2008, 09:00 PM
I guess it's like people who get a cute puppy and don't like the dog he grows up to be and they get rid of him :(

I'm going to take a guess on this one, but it's more like someone got a Doberman puppy and didn't realize how big he'd grow to be.

When you talk about urban areas, most people don't have the space for a big bush in their yard. It might have been planted there by another owner who was just looking for something that grew fast without consideration to how big it would get.

Doesn't make the situation any nicer, but between a beautiful bush or giving my children room to run...I'd pick my kids.

When I lived in Dallas I remember seeing how ridiculously small yards were. I have to imagine that it's worse in Brooklyn. Most of us on this board are fortunate to have the space to host something like this. :)