PDA

View Full Version : Tree Grove in Missouri



Red Maple
10-31-2005, 09:04 PM
Jim, one of our members in Willow Springs, Missouri is trying to determine the name of a grove of trees found on his property.

Red Maple
10-31-2005, 09:15 PM
Here are a few more photos from Jim.

Quirky Quercus
11-01-2005, 12:58 PM
Those aren't all the same tree, are they? Which photos are different trees?

saccharum
11-01-2005, 06:04 PM
How tall are these trees? What's the largest diameter?

chaspen
11-02-2005, 09:52 PM
How tall are these trees? What's the largest diameter? The three trees you see in the center of the picture are about 60 feet tall. One that was cut down was over sixty feet and the stump was 24 inches across. Chaspen

chaspen
11-02-2005, 10:01 PM
Those aren't all the same tree, are they? Which photos are different trees?These trees are the first to bloom in the Spring. Only the three largest trees bloom and cannot find any fruit. They are the first to leaf and the last to drop. On this date they are still green and all others are dropping. They sucker from the root. Too me they appear to be a cross of an Aspen and our Wild Cherry tree. The bark has the taste of a Wild Cherry. I put one tree through a band saw and the sawdust is reddish pink and during sawing the dust has a very strong smell of "marischino" cherries in a jar. The wood is unique and the boards are drying now. To answer the above question the three trees in the center are the unknowns.

saccharum
11-02-2005, 10:23 PM
They look very much like cherries, but I'm at a bit of a loss as to which species. They don't look to me like black cherries (Prunus serotina), which is the only cherry I know of (native to your area, at least) that reguarly grows to such large size. Some of the leaves in the first picture look like black cherry, but that leaf in "tree one.jpg" does not.

I'm stumped. :?

nightrust
11-03-2005, 12:14 PM
The bark in the "008" picture closely resembles two Kwanzan flowering cherries I have in my front yard, which are by no means close to as large as these trees, nor do they have any kind of central leader.

The leaves in "009" are similar to the Kwanzan leaves, as well.

I'm at a loss.

Red Maple
11-03-2005, 12:31 PM
I think we can safely rule out the choke cherry, Prunus virginiana, because of the bark of this tree. The mature black cherry, Prunus serotina has scaly bark broken into plates, which doesn't match the posted photos. Once again the bark doesn't seem right, but I'm not sure.

Try a few Google image searches and see if you agree.

http://images.google.com

1. Prunus virginiana + bark
2. Prunus serotina + bark
3. Missouri Dept of Forestry - Prunus serotina

http://mdc.mo.gov/nathis/plantpage/flora/motrees/p42.htm

I still think this might be a sweet cherry, Prunus avium. Click on this link and look at the photos.

http://www.cnr.vt.edu/dendro/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=63

I also looked in the book,Trees of Missouri, by Don Kurz for clues.

saccharum
11-03-2005, 01:31 PM
I agree that the leaves and bark are a better match for sweet cherry, but I've never seen them grow that large in the US. I've heard they can reach 60' tall and sawtimber diameter in their native range, so maybe Chaspen's site is just exceptionally good for that species.

Red Maple
11-03-2005, 03:04 PM
Hello Chaspen,

I know you really want to find out more about these trees and their beautiful wood.

Please tell us who has tried to identify this grove of trees? I seem to remember you said the local Cooperative Extension Service couldn't tell the name of these trees. I can't remember if you said whether a forester had taken a look at them yet?

Given the size of these trees maybe you have a State Champion Tree? One way to figure out what you have is to contact a Missouri Conservation District Forester and verify the species and measurements of the largest remaining tree in the grove.

Excerpt taken from: In Search of Champions, by Bruce Palmer

"The purpose of the Champion Tree Program is to recognize and record the largest known specimen of every tree species in the state. To be eligible for listing, a species must be native or naturalized. Native trees are those found growing wild in our forests. Naturalized trees are exotic (introduced) species that have become common and establish themselves as if they are native."

Missouri Department of Conservation Forestry Division - Champion Tree Program

http://www.conservation.state.mo.us/forest/IandE/MOChampionTrees/

Click here to find your Local Missouri Forester

http://www.mdc.mo.gov/forest/myforester-search.html

chaspen
11-03-2005, 07:30 PM
I think we can safely rule out the choke cherry, Prunus virginiana, because of the bark of this tree. The mature black cherry, Prunus serotina has scaly bark broken into plates, which doesn't match the posted photos. Once again the bark doesn't seem right, but I'm not sure.

Try a few Google image searches and see if you agree.

http://images.google.com

1. Prunus virginiana + bark
2. Prunus serotina + bark
3. Missouri Dept of Forestry - Prunus serotina

http://mdc.mo.gov/nathis/plantpage/flora/motrees/p42.htm

I still think this might be a sweet cherry, Prunus avium. Click on this link and look at the photos.

http://www.cnr.vt.edu/dendro/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=63

I also looked in the book,Trees of Missouri, by Don Kurz for clues.

Red Maple
05-17-2006, 04:02 PM
I would appreciate it if everyone would take a second look at these unknown trees. I'm going to contact Jim in Willow Springs, Missouri to see if they flowered this spring.

Quirky Quercus
05-18-2006, 09:15 AM
This is an old post but I have recently had my eye on Cherry Birch- Betula lenta. Do a searcharoo on betula lenta and see what that turns up.