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eriwoj
10-06-2004, 09:49 PM
I am attempting to start an Elm in the flower bed just out side my house. It doesn't get heavy sun and I make sure it has a good amount of water. Obviously, with fall here, it is changing color. I hope it comes back in the spring. As it grows, will there any way to prevent it from getting Dutch Elm Disease?

pwk16
10-07-2004, 12:23 PM
Dutch elm disease affects all sorts of elm trees, but the American elm is the most susceptible. The Asian elms, Siberian and Chinese, are the least susceptible with all others falling somewhere in the middle.
There is no cure, but sometimes infected areas may be pruned away. Early detection is the best way of preventing your tree from succumbing to the disease.

Here is a good site on the subject:

http://muextension.missouri.edu/xplor/agguides/pests/g07253.htm

There are nurseries around the country working on finding a resistant cultivar, but I don't believe they have it perfected at this point.

eriwoj
10-10-2004, 08:45 PM
Thank you for giving me a link to that site. It was very informative. Now, I understand why when my parents cut up all the dead wood around their home, including dead and dying elms, for fire wood it takes several years before any more elms begin to die. Cutting and burning the wood must retard the growth or spread of the beetles or fungus. I will have to tell them to keep doing what they are doing, and maybe, there will be at least a few elms left for the next few years.

Quirky Quercus
10-12-2004, 01:54 PM
eriwo,

Thank You for doing your part to keeps some elms around for future generations. Too many people don't plant them for fear of the disease and if everyone took that attitude you can see the problem.

There are some cultivars that are claimed to be resistant but they are expensive and slower growing.

I took some cuttings from some elms growing in the wild near here and they were all doing so well and sprouting some leaves. Then the hurricane hit and although I was able to take the box of cuttings inside, they got dried up and did not survive.

Bones
12-08-2004, 10:16 AM
Thank you for giving me a link to that site. It was very informative. Now, I understand why when my parents cut up all the dead wood around their home, including dead and dying elms, for fire wood it takes several years before any more elms begin to die. Cutting and burning the wood must retard the growth or spread of the beetles or fungus. I will have to tell them to keep doing what they are doing, and maybe, there will be at least a few elms left for the next few years.

Unfortunately, using the elm wood as fire wood is part of the disease problem. The stacked branches become a brood site for the beetle (unless it is debarked) which then carries the disease to healthy trees. IN some states, your woodpile is inspected and if bark on elm wood is discovered, you must destroy it. You can cover the wood with visqueen, until it is cured, but leaving it exposed is a recipe for elm disaster.

saccharum
12-08-2004, 02:47 PM
Bones is right, elm wood needs to be either completely debarked or completely covered with a tarp (with the edges of the tarp sealed with dirt) to avoid feeding & breeding the bark beetles that spread DED.

At this point, the best way to avoid DED is to either plant the Asian elms that pwk mentioned (skip the Siberian elm, however - it's a junky tree and somewhat invasive), or one of the new DED-resistant American elm cultivars.